Tag Archives: Descartes

The Inflamed Mind

There’s a growing body of research linking mental health and the immune system. In his new book, The Inflamed Mind, Professor Edward Bullmore claims that we need treatments that can break the vicious cycle of stress, inflammation and depression. Speaking … Continue reading

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Being disembodied

Sociologist Ian Burkitt comments that our experience of the self has become “essentially disembodied” (Burkitt, 1999). In truth, we can’t be disembodied – unless you share Descartes’ weird belief in an incorporeal self – but many people experience life as … Continue reading

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Merleau-Ponty

This is the first of a series of posts that introduce thinkers who have been especially influential on my work. I begin with the French philosopher Merleau-Ponty (1908-1961), who was a pioneer in the study of embodiment. Merleau-Ponty was fascinated by our ‘being-in-the-world’ – the way … Continue reading

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Descartes revisited

My previous post (Descartes’ stove: Philosophers and place) had more responses than any before it. Although there was only one blog comment, there’s been a lively conversation over on my Facebook page. I want to pick up on two themes of that discussion: Am … Continue reading

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Descartes’ stove: Philosophers and place

Descartes is considered to be the father of modern philosophy. No wonder we’re in such a mess! You’re probably familiar with his theory, but to recap: Descartes considered the possibility that some very powerful, cunning and malicious demon might be deceiving him. He reasons that there … Continue reading

Posted in Embodiment | Tagged , , , , | 3 Comments