Tag Archives: bodymind

The Endorphin Effect

I’ve recently facilitated a series of workshops on mindfulness and spirituality at a drug and alcohol rehab clinic. The most popular workshop by far was the one where I taught people how to use William Bloom’s Endorphin Effect. Endorphins, which … Continue reading

Posted in Psychotherapy | Tagged , , , , , , | 5 Comments

Wholebody Focusing – Grounding into being here

I’ve only done an introductory week-end of Wholebody Focusing (WBF), so these initial thoughts are somewhat tentative, but I want to touch on the role of grounding in WBF. Gene Gendlin, the philosopher/psychotherapist who developed Focusing, states that the body … Continue reading

Posted in Psychotherapy | Tagged , , | 1 Comment

Embodied peacemaking

This is the 100th anniversary of the day Britain entered the First World War. Over 16 million people died. This was not to be the ‘war to end all wars’: conflict continues around the world, and many millions more have … Continue reading

Posted in Embodiment | Tagged , , | 2 Comments

Hand, World and Self

Mark Cahill has just had a hand transplant. His existing hand was so damaged by gout as to be useless, so surgeons amputated it and transplanted a donor’s hand. The team involved are pleased. Not only does the the transplant … Continue reading

Posted in Embodiment, Psychotherapy | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Architecture and the bodymind

I’ve discussed the healing power of nature elsewhere in the this blog (Nature and health), but of course architecture can work in a similar way. Esther Sternberg, MD, a neuroimmunologist and medical researcher, describes how simply changing the ceiling tiles in an intensive care unit … Continue reading

Posted in Cognitive science | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

The Stupidity of Rationalism

Last weeks edition of ‘In Our Time’ (BBC Radio 4) discussed game theory and gave a telling account of a scenario called The Prisoners Dilemma. Imagine that Jo and Jack have been arrested for a crime. The police know they’re guilty but can’t prove it, so … Continue reading

Posted in Cognitive science | Tagged , , , , , | 8 Comments

Floating

I’ve been exploring how bodymind and place are woven together, but what happens when there is no place for the bodymind to be in? The floatation tank was originally developed by John Lilly, who was – amongst other things – a psychoanalyst and philosopher. It’s basically a sound and light-tight tank of salt … Continue reading

Posted in What works? | Tagged , , | 1 Comment

Thinking with place

I spend last week-end at an ecopsychology retreat in Lancashire. We were staying in a stone barn in the woods, very close to a peat stained river that surged over ancient rocks. On Saturday I paired up with a colleague for a ‘medicine walk’. … Continue reading

Posted in Ecopsychology | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Being disembodied

Sociologist Ian Burkitt comments that our experience of the self has become “essentially disembodied” (Burkitt, 1999). In truth, we can’t be disembodied – unless you share Descartes’ weird belief in an incorporeal self – but many people experience life as … Continue reading

Posted in Embodiment | Tagged , , , | 2 Comments

Merleau-Ponty

This is the first of a series of posts that introduce thinkers who have been especially influential on my work. I begin with the French philosopher Merleau-Ponty (1908-1961), who was a pioneer in the study of embodiment. Merleau-Ponty was fascinated by our ‘being-in-the-world’ – the way … Continue reading

Posted in Key ideas | Tagged , , , , , | 5 Comments