Category Archives: Ecopsychology

Embodied Ecology: A Relational Vision

One core principle lies at the heart of embodied ecology: We are relational earthbodies, fundamentally intertwined with the more-than-human-world. Almost every thinker I’ve discussed on this blog speaks that same truth in their own voice. Let’s listen to a few. … Continue reading

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The European Journal of Ecopsychology

I’ve written a couple of articles for The European Journal of Ecopsychology (EJE) in the past and I’m delighted to say that I’m a member of the new Editorial Team. The Journal is peer-reviewed and explores “the synthesis of psychological … Continue reading

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Glen Mazis

Glen Mazis is a philosopher and poet whose writing frequently merges both skills. I came across his book Earthbodies (2002) during my PhD research on embodied knowing and found it hugely exciting. Mazis explains that ‘bodies’ are much more than … Continue reading

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David Abram

David Abram’s first book, The Spell of the Sensuous, (1996) has influenced pretty much everyone in the world of ecopsychology and environmental philosophy. Its themes are summed up in the subtitle: Perception and Language in a More-than-human world. By way … Continue reading

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Nature Connection: Have you got it yet?

When I used to run nature connection workshops back in 2010, it was a struggle to get people to sign up. It seemed that people didn’t get what nature connection was or why they might want more of it. But … Continue reading

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The Wilderness Effect

Ecopsychologist Rob Greenway used to guide people on wilderness treks and after years of research concluded that “civilization is only four days deep” (Greenway, 1995). When people go on long treks in the wilderness they start out enthusiastic: They’re feeling … Continue reading

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The Future of Ecotherapy

My ecotherapy work is featured in the Winter issue of JUNO magazine and the interviewer raises an interesting question: Why isn’t therapy in nature more widespread? Ecotherapy sounds very novel, but it isn’t really. Doing walk and talk therapy isn’t … Continue reading

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Make it real

Right now in a park or garden near you there are real spiders weaving real webs. If you watch this video, you’ll probably have forgotten it by this time tomorrow. If you ever watch a spider weaving a web in … Continue reading

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Protest Marches: What’s the point?

I was at the Climate Change March in London on Sunday. I hadn’t planned on going. “What’s the point?” I thought. I’ve been to many protest marches over the years and I’d begun to doubt if they made any difference. … Continue reading

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New place, new thinking?

After living in London for several decades, I recently moved to Devon. Today marks my first month here and I’m wondering if living in the countryside instead of the city is having any impact on my thinking. Philosopher Christopher Preston … Continue reading

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